Chu again pitches constitutional reform if he is elected president

The China Post
Date: December 3, 2015
By: Yuan-Ming Chiao

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Kuomintang (KMT) Chairman and 2016 presidential candidate Eric Chu (朱

KMT Chairman Eric Chu addresses the party's Central Standing Committee, in Taipei, yesterday. Chu again called for sweeping constitutional reforms, including lowering the voting age to 18. He pledged that his cabinet would need to be approved by the Legislature with a "confidence vote" if he were to be elected president. (Yuan-Ming Chiao, The China Post)

KMT Chairman Eric Chu addresses the party’s Central Standing Committee, in Taipei, yesterday. Chu again called for sweeping constitutional reforms, including lowering the voting age to 18. He pledged that his cabinet would need to be approved by the Legislature with a “confidence vote” if he were to be elected president. (Yuan-Ming Chiao, The China Post)

立倫) yesterday pledged to seek a “vote of confidence” to confirm his cabinet should he become president following the Jan. 16 election.

Chu outlined his most recent proposal for constitutional reform at the party’s Central Standing Committee (CSC). The “vote of confidence” for potential members of a Chu administration would require legislative support. He argued that such a mechanism would do away with the current semi-presidential system in which the country’s president “has authority that is not answerable (to the Legislature).” Chu said he would also opt to give a State of the Union-style report to the Legislature.

The KMT leader and his party’s legislative caucus have proposed constitutional reforms in the past, including lowering the voting age to 18 and restoring the Legislature’s power to vote on the appointment of the premier (閣揆同意權). He called on the opposition to support the plan, though inter-party talks on the reforms broke down in the last session when the KMT and opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) squabbled over whether reforms should be prioritized or completed in a package deal. Chu also took time to reiterate the KMT’s support for absentee balloting, an issue viewed with suspicion by the DPP.

“By returning the power to vote on the appointment of the premier to the Legislature, votes of non-confidence can be utilized as would current mechanisms included within the Constitution,” Chu added.     [FULL  STORY]

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