Food

ASF virus found in Chinese meat product: COA

Focus Taiwan
Date: 2018/10/31
By: Wu Hsin-yun and Flor Wang 

Taipei, Oct. 31 (CNA) Amid government efforts to keep African Swine Fever (ASF) at bay, the Council of Agriculture (COA) announced Wednesday that a Chinese meat product brought by passengers into Taiwan has been detected to contain the deadly virus.

“The Animal Health Research Institute discovered the ASF virus today in a meat product brought by passengers from China to Kinmen,” COA Deputy Minister Huang Chin-cheng (黃金城) told a news conference.

The tainted product, Chinese crispy sausage, was sent to the institute for examination after being collected by institute officers Oct. 25 from a garbage container at Shuitou Port in offshore Kinmen County, apparently having been discarded by passengers coming from China’s Fujian Province via the ferry services between the two destinations, Huang explained.

According to Huang, the sausage was made by Shuanghai — the largest processed food maker in China. Shuanghui’s meat products have been repeatedly found to contain the ASF virus since the outbreak of the disease in China first surfaced Aug. 3, he noted.
[FULL  STORY]

Whitebait a good source of calcium… and cholesterol

Radio Taiwan International
Date: 2018-09-17

Tiny white fish – known as whitebait – are commonly eaten in Taiwan. It’s a delicacy consisting of immature fish from a number of different species, including anchovies and sardines. But while people often eat them for their health benefits, health experts are sounding the alarm.

These tiny “whitebait” are often served up in soups and porridges in Taiwan. They not only add flavor to the dish, they are also a good source of calcium.

But health experts are warning that there are health concerns, too. That’s because they are consumed whole, which means you ingest the intestines and fat, and a surprising amount of cholesterol for such a tiny fish.    [FULL  STORY]

Taiwan restaurant serving up ice cream shaped like Shar-Pei puppies [VIDEO]

The hottest item on the menu in a Taiwan restaurant is puppy ice cream!

ABC7 Chicago 
Date: August 19, 2018

The hottest item on the menu in a Taiwan restaurant is puppy ice cream!

The sweet treat is shaped like a Shar-Pei pooch, and comes in peanut, chocolate or milk tea flavors.

Just one puppy confection takes five hours to create, with special attention to the eyes and the wrinkled features. That’s why even though this ice cream is so popular, they can only make 100 a day.

The puppies start melting fast, so they’re served up quickly.

The canine treats cost up to $6, depending on the size.  [SOURCE]

Frozen fruit festival showcases giant grass jelly dessert in Southern Taiwan

4000 free popsicles will be distributed to the public this weekend

Taiwan News 
Date: 2018/06/09
By: Scott Morgan, Taiwan News, Staff Writer

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – The Tainan frozen fruit festival (台南冰果節) is in full swing

Main stand at the Tainan frozen fruit festival (By Central News Agency)

this weekend, with a 210 cm long grass jelly dessert being the main attraction in Shanhua District (善化區), Tainan County (臺南縣).

The festival will provide 2,000 free popsicles on both Saturday and Sunday to welcome visitors.

The 210 cm long, 50 cm wide grass jelly dessert was the focal point of the festival today. The giant treat was distributed to the public, who were enthusiastically waiting in a long queue, by the Shanhua farmer’s association, reports said.

Around 4,000 locals and tourists attended the festival today, with another 2,000 expected tomorrow, according to the Liberty Times.    [FULL  STORY]

Five-year-old girl in central Taiwan dies after suffering alleged abuse by her uncle

The girl, who lived in Tianwei Township, Chunghua County had reportedly endured long-term physical abuse at the hands of her uncle Yang, was transferred to Changhua Christian Hospital from a local hospital Tuesday afternoon in critical condition

Taiwan News
Date: 2018/05/23
By: George Liao, Taiwan News, Staff Writer

TAIPEI (Taiwan News)—A five-year-old girl in central Taiwan died Wednesday afternoon of

(By Central News Agency)

severe injuries allegedly inflicted by her uncle.

According to police, the deceased was born when her mother surnamed Lin was only 17. When Lin divorced her husband, Lin took care of her daughter with her older sister. But after Lin got remarried, she placed her daughter under the care of her sister and her sister’s husband surnamed Yang, police said.

The girl, who lived in Tianwei Township, Chunghua County had reportedly endured long-term physical abuse at the hands of her uncle Yang, was transferred to Changhua Christian Hospital from a local hospital Tuesday afternoon in critical condition after suffering an alleged attack by Yang. She suffered from an anal fissure, intracerebral hemorrhage, and new and old marks of injuries were found in many parts of her body, according to media reports.    [FULL  STORY]

Taiwan’s Din Tai Fung coming to Seattle Mariner’s Safeco Field

Taiwan’s Din Tai Fung to be pitching out wontons and boba tea behind home plate at Safeco Field when Seattle Mariner’s season bats off 

Taiwan News 
Date: 2018/03/16
By: Keoni Everington, Taiwan News, Staff Writer

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Taiwan’s renown Din Tai Fung (鼎泰豐) restaurant will be pitching

Din Tai Fung spicy dumplings. (Photo by flickr user Rob Hyndam)

out wontons behind home plate at the the Seattle Mariner’s Safeco Field once the 2018 Major League Baseball season gets swinging.

Safeco Field, the home of the Seattle Mariners announced on Thursday (March 15) that Taiwan-based Din Tai Fung will occupy the International Wok space behind home plate on the main level. The menu will include pork wontons, wonton soup, steam bao buns as well as a vegetarian option which will have bok choy, tofu, mushrooms and vermicelli noodles, according to MYNorthwest.

Also on the menu are garlic string beans, chicken fried rice, hot and sour soup and boba tea with tapioca pearls, reported MLB.com.    [FULL  STORY]

Street food dominates Michelin’s ‘Bib Gourmand’ for Taipei

Focus Taiwan
Date: 2018/03/06
By: Lee Hsin-Yin

Taipei, March 6 (CNA) A week ahead of the eagerly-awaited announcements of the first

CNA file photo

selection of the Michelin Guide Taipei, the publisher on Tuesday released a “Bib Gourmand” list, with street food dominating the selections.

The Bib Gourmand is a distinction given by Michelin inspectors to establishments offering a quality meal within a fixed price range under €36 (US$44.40), according to Michelin.

The list is expected to complement the guide, which will include three tiers of restaurants with one, two and three Michelin stars representing very good cooking, excellent cooking worth a detour and exceptional cuisine worth a journey, respectively.

The inaugural Bib Gourmand selection for Taipei includes 36 addresses, out of which 10 are offerings from Taiwan’s famous night markets.    [FULL  STORY]

Watch: Taiwanese Chicken Cutlets as Big as Your Face [VIDEO]

‘Cult Following’ checks out Hot Star in LA

Eater.com
Date: Sep 14, 2017
By: Serena Dai and Eater

One of the most popular vendors at the famed Shilin Night Market in Taiwan is Hot Star, a purveyor that claims to make fried chicken cutlets as big as your face. The Taipei street food has gotten so popular that it’s since expanded to more than 100 locations internationally, including three in the Los Angeles area.

In this episode of Cult Following, host Serena Dai and her Taiwanese-American buddy Melody Peng visit an outpost in Pasadena, California to try the dish that’s been called “the food” of the Shilin Night Market. Peng has been to the original and says a huge line always snakes around the stand. Although Peng grew up going to the market when visiting family, fried chicken cutlets didn’t become a destination, she says, until Hot Star opened there in the early ’90s. Peng savors her first bite: “I feel like I’m back in Taiwan.”
[SOURCE]

Best Hot Pot Places in Taipei

Hot pot comes in all kinds of flavors and price points in Taipei and here is a list of hot pot places you should try.

The News Lens
Date: 2017/09/03

For Taiwanese people, hot pot can be a daily staple no matter the season. Some even say that eating hot pot is one of the most intimate ways for people to share a meal and almost intuitive choice of food when dining with friends.

In Taiwan, there are nearly five thousand restaurants serving a variety of hot pots at a wide range of price points. Different styles of hot pot include shabu-shabu, mala spicy hot pot, mutton hot pot, and stinky tofu hot pot, just to name a few. Some restaurants also have their own signature sauce and specialty dish.

A well-known Japanese way of eating hot pot is to pour rice into the rich broth at the end of the meal, crack a fresh egg inside and sprinkle some scallion over — a new bowl of deliciousness. “Eating hot pot is just like cooking. You can be as creative and spontaneous as you please,” reads a section in “Good Eye Taipei,” a new bilingual Taipei city guide.   [FULL  STORY]

Popcorn chicken, beef noodles most popular Taiwanese foods with Universiade athletes

Popcorn chicken, beef noodles, and scallion pancakes are most popular Taiwanese foods with athletes at Taipei Universiade

Taiwan News
Date: 2017/08/24
By: Keoni Everington, Taiwan News, Staff Writer

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — The most popular Taiwanese foods being served at the

Beef noodle soup. (CNA image)

Athletes’ Village Canteen during the ongoing Taipei Universiade games are popcorn chicken, beef noodles and scallion pancakes, according to the Taipei 2017 Universiade Organizing Committee.

The Athlete’s Village Canteen is currently serving 35,000 to 40,000 meals a day, and the top five most popular foods are pizza, popcorn chicken, scrambled eggs, spaghetti, and beef noodles, with 350 kilograms of popcorn chicken being consumed daily, according the Universiade Restaurant Management Office. Rounding out the top 10 are toasted sandwiches, various other types of noodles, wontons, meat balls, and Tandoori chicken.

The top most popular Taiwanese foods being consumed are popcorn chicken, beef noodles, and scallion cakes. In addition to the daily consumption of 350 kg, 900 bowls of beef noodles and 500 slices of scallion pancakes are also scarfed up each day.    [FULL  STORY]